Plurality in Teaching Macroeconomics Rohit Azad

For economists, the Great Recession—the worst crisis the world has seen since the Great Depression of the 1930s - has highlighted the need for plurality in macroeconomics education. Ironically, however, there is a move towards greater insularity from alternative or contrasting points of view. Whereas, what is required for vibrant policymaking is an open-minded academic engagement between contesting viewpoints. In fact, there does not even exist a textbook that contrasts these contesting ideas in a tractable manner. This pedagogical paper is an attempt to plug that gap by presenting a comparative study across different traditions in macroeconomics in a unified…

The True Face of the Global Recovery C. P. Chandrasekhar and Jayati Ghosh

Optimistic assessments of the synchronised recovery across the world economy ignore the factors driving the weak upturn that make it fragile. True_Face_Global_Recovery  (Download the full text in PDF format) (This article was originally posted in the Business Line on April 10, 2018.)

The imperial intentions of Trump’s trade war babble Andrew M. Fischer

Trump’s trade tirades are being vigorously disputed by liberal economists the world over, although the riposte is usually in defence of free trade and existing trade deals. However, many of these same economists have promulgated the underlying idea that US trade deficits are the result of some sort of disadvantage or decline. For instance, as I discussed in 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012, many prominent economists such as Paul Krugman argued then (and many still do now) that China’s undervalued currency gave it an unfair advantage, causing deficits and even financial bubbles in the US. Many economists on the left…

How unequal are world incomes? C. P. Chandrasekhar and Jayati Ghosh

Global inequality has reduced as income growth shifts from the Northern countries to emerging markets like the BRICS. But this shift is quite limited and has not benefited the bulk of people in the developing world. Unequal_World_Incomes (Download the full text in PDF format) (This article was originally posted in the Business Line on 27 March 2018.)  

National Income in India: What’s really growing? Jayati Ghosh

Recent income growth in India has been dominated by sectors that do not reflect real physical output increases – such as finance, insurance and real estate and public administration and defence.   National_Income  (Download the full text in PDF format) (This article was originally published in the Business Line on February 27, 2018.)

The Aging of a Growth Engine C.P. Chandrasekhar and Jayati Ghosh

With the dollar value of exports declining, India’s software sector faces a historical crisis which may worsen, given the protectionist trends in the US and other uncertainties. Aging_Growth_Engine  (Download the full text in PDF format) (This article was originally published in the Business Line on February 13, 2018)

The Top 1 Percent of Thailand: Their income sources and tax due Pasuk Phongpaichit and Francis Cripps

The rising share of total income held by the top 1 percent has had a substantial impact on income inequality in developed countries. In the United States, the share of the top 1 percent more than doubled from 9 percent in 1976 to 20 percent in 2011. In other rich countries, the trend was similar but the scale differed among countries. Some have argued that this concentration is a result of technological changes increasing the rewards to skill, but the differences in scale across countries with similar technological context suggests that institutional and policy factors are more  important. Top_1_Percent_Thailand (Download…

The Financialization of Finance? Demonetization and the Dubious Push to Cashlessness in India C.P. Chandrasekhar and Jayati Ghosh

This Debate contribution describes the promotion of digital rather than cash payments as a form of the financialization of finance, in its role as a payments system, with reference to recent Indian experience. The obsession with digital transactions as a marker of social and material progress is misplaced; it may become yet another means by which finance extracts rentier incomes out of relatively poor populations. Financialisation_Finance (Download the full text in PDF format) (This article was originally posted in the Wiley Online Library)

A Note on Estimating Income Inequality across countries using PPP Exchange Rates Jayati Ghosh

The use of exchange rates based on Purchasing Power Parities to compare income across countries and over time has become standard practise. But there are reasons to believe this could lead to excessively inflated incomes for poor countries and in some cases also inflate the extent of real changes over time. Estimates of gross domestic product growth in Chinese and Indian economies in recent years provide examples of this. ELRR_PPP_Exchange_Rates (Download the full text in PDF format) (This article was originally posted in the Economic and Labour Relations Review on January 30, 2018.)