Public Management, Policy Capacity, Innovation and Development Erkki Karo and Rainer Kattel

This paper discusses how and why policy capacity evolves; and why under certain circumstances complementarities or mismatches between the public and private sectors emerge. Public_Management (Download the full text in PDF format) (This paper was originally published in the Brazilian Journal of Political Economy, vol. 34, nº 1 (134), pp. 80-102, January-March/2014.)

Workers Dying in Qatar Jayati Ghosh

The grim news coming out of Qatar about the deaths of hundreds of migrant workers from India and other (mostly South Asian) countries provides an insight into the appalling lack of concern for human life among employers there. The problem seems especially bad in the construction industry, as companies try to finish sites for the next World Cup at breakneck speed. It underlines the double standards with respect to local and migrant workers, as well as the divisions among the migrants themselves, between expatriates from rich countries and those employed in the dirty, difficult and dangerous activities that locals no…

Jeff Bezos could be Wrong C.P. Chandrasekhar

Amazon founder and Chief Executive, Jeff Bezos, has given America’s ailing newspaper industry cause for cheer. In a move that still baffles most market watchers, Bezos as Bezos, and not through Amazon, has bought The Washington Post for $250 million, or 17 times its earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) according to market estimates. That kind of premium makes little sense even for a profitable venture, which The Post is not. The newspaper division of The Washington Post Co., which notched up losses of $21 million in 2010 and $54 million in 2012, has reportedly already lost $49…

Is South-South Economic Interaction Any Better for Poor Countries? Jayati Ghosh

It used to be believed that that economic interaction between developing countries (South-South integration) would necessarily be more beneficial than North-South links. The latter were seen as reproducing the global division of labour that emerged by the mid 20thcentury, whereby much of the developing world essentially specialised in primary commodities and labour-intensive (and therefore lower productivity) manufactured goods, while the North kept the monopoly of high value added production. By contrast, trade and investment links between countries in the Global South were supposed to allow for more diversification because of their more similar stages of development, thus creating more synergies.…

Catching Up and Knowledge Governance Rainer Kattel

The author provides a theoretical framework that makes it possible to create a taxonomy of knowledge governance regimes and elucidate what is needed for catching-up strategies. Knowledge_Governance (Download the full text in PDF format) (This chapter has been published in the volume “Knowledge Governance: Reasserting the Public Interest,” edited by Leonardo Burlamaqui, Ana Célia Castro and Rainer Kattel. London: Anthem Press, 2012. ISBN: 9780857285355.)

India’s Supermarket Move Shows its Tired Government has Run Out of Ideas Jayati Ghosh

India's ruling coalition has been rocked after its second-largest partner withdrew this week. The latest round of political instability comes about because Prime Minister Manmohan Singh announced a number of economic measures without consulting his allies. The announcements – that diesel prices were to be raised, and that India's retail and domestic aviation sectors were to be opened up to overseas companies such as Tesco – were the government's attempt to woo back foreign investors who had become cynical about India's growth prospects. The opposition parties protested against these measures with a nationwide strike today. More damaging for the government is the…