Economic Integration and Free Mobility of Labour Prabhat Patnaik

There is a view that the discontent among the English workers that caused the Brexit vote was not because of European economic integration as such, but because of the policy of free internal migration that has accompanied this integration; that if Europe had not enacted free migration within the EU, then its economic integration would have been more successful. Its economic integration then would have remained confined to the free movement of goods and capital alone but not of labour, and that such free movement, i.e. of goods and capital alone, is beneficial for the countries being economically integrated. The…

Why the European Union should be Even More Worried about Brexit C.P. Chandrasekhar and Jayati Ghosh

The economic pressures that may have driven the Brexit vote are also evident in other big European nations. So to survive, the EU must rethink its template for economic policies.   European_Union_Worried (Download the full text in PDF format) (This article was originally published in the Business Line on July 18, 2016.)

Brexit Earthquake has Many Ruptures Radhika Desai

The Brexit vote was a momentous political earthquake and the seismic shifts that caused it have been long in the making. It has ruptured so many political structures — decades and even centuries old, national and international — so deeply it could be decades before its damage can be fully reckoned. The damage reveals the fragility of Britain’s, and the West’s, political and economic structures caused by three-and-a-half decades of neoliberalism and austerity. The Bremainers’ entirely laudable cosmopolitanism and anti-racism were tragically mixed up with a blindness to how fast and how far formerly social-democratic Europe had become neoliberal. The…