NAMA: Developed Countries as the Donors? Malini Chakravarty

Texts related to the Non Agricultural Market Access (NAMA) in the ongoing Doha Round of WTO negotiations, right from the time of its inception, have been biased against the developing country members. This article traces the development in the various NAMA texts and tries to bring out the factors that have come to form the core of the contention between the developed and the developing countries. Doha_Round_Negotiations (Download the full text in PDF format)

Is NAMA a Tool of Development? or Another Manifestation of Asymmetries in WTO Rules? Mehdi Shafaeddin

This brief argues that the collapse of the talks in the Doha Round actually arises because of fundamental reasons related to the contradictions in design and implementation of WTO rules. There are also inconsistencies between the agreed Doha Text and the subsequent proposals made by developed countries during the process of negotiations. This article concentrates on the issues related to NAMA (non-agricultural market access) as an example. NAMA (Download the full text in PDF format)

The Breakdown of WTO Negotiations: Some Implications for Developing Countries Anamitra Roychowdhury

The Doha 'Development' Round of world trade negotiations that began in 2001 collapsed this July in Geneva. After the Hong Kong Ministerial in December, 2005 it was decided that the ministers would again meet to sketch out the "modalities" for agriculture and NAMA (Non-Agricultural Market Access). An unofficial target of end 2006 was set to bring out the full package of agreement (based on the modalities)[1]. As a result the ministers met in end June for a series of informal meetings of the Trade Negotiating Committee (TNC) and a set of "Green Room" meetings (28th- 30th), followed by a formal…

Course Change in Global Trade Negotiations C.P. Chandrasekhar

The indefinite suspension, on July 1, of the Doha Round of world trade negotiations calls for some rethinking on the expectations India has from a new multilateral agreement. The suspension proved unavoidable when it became clear that the US was offering too little by way of reduced protection for its own agricultural sector, while demanding large concessions in terms of agricultural and non-agricultural market access from the rest of the world. The US offer on reduction of support and protection to its own agriculture was absurd. The US and the EU have increasingly resorted to substituting trade-distorting support with support…

The Breakdown of WTO Negotiations: Some Implications for Developing Countries Anamitra Roychowdhury

The Doha 'Development' Round of world trade negotiations that began in 2001 collapsed this July in Geneva. After the Hong Kong Ministerial in December, 2005 it was decided that the ministers would again meet to sketch out the "modalities" for agriculture and NAMA (Non-Agricultural Market Access). An unofficial target of end 2006 was set to bring out the full package of agreement (based on the modalities)[1]. As a result the ministers met in end June for a series of informal meetings of the Trade Negotiating Committee (TNC) and a set of "Green Room" meetings (28th- 30th), followed by a formal…

Watch out NAMA : You are on a Slippery Sip Road of De-industrialization and Backwardness Mehdi Shafaeddin

Following the failure of the talks on NAMA and a number of other issues in WTO to conclude before the end of April, Mr. Lamy has warned that the price of the "failure" is high. I entirely agree with him that the "price of the failure will be high", but my concept of "failure" is different from that of Mr. Lamy. He is referring to the "failure" to conclude an agreement. What I have in my mind is the risk of the "failure" by developing countries to fully appreciate that accepting the proposals made by developed countries on NAMA will…

NAMA: Downplaying the Danger C.P. Chandrasekhar

In the run up to the Hong Kong WTO Ministerial, the focus of attention is the deadlock over liberalisation of agriculture. This is not surprising, given the fact that the unwillingness of EU members, especially France, to agree to "adequate" concessions on agricultural tariffs and subsidies, has stalled negotiations on further liberalisation of trade in areas outside of agriculture. What is disturbing, however, is the perception purveyed by the negotiators, government spokespersons and the media that once the agriculture deadlock is resolved, the task of moving the Doha Round forward is rendered easy: that is, the prospect of getting the…

The Dalian Mini Ministerial and the Road to Hong Kong: Uncertain future for WTO Parthapratim Pal and Shravani Prakash

The forthcoming Hong Kong Ministerial meet of WTO is facing a problem. Slow progress of the Doha round of negotiations has led to a large number of unresolved issues in all key areas of negotiations. A recent informal meet of prominent WTO Members at Dalian, China did not manage to make much progress. This paper takes stock of the current round of negotiations and assesses the prospect of the Hong Kong Ministerial. Dalian_Mini_Ministerial (Download the full text in PDF format)

The WTO Negotiations on Industrial Tariffs: What is at stake for developing countries? Yilmaz Akyuz

This paper focuses on the implications of the negotiations on industrial tariffs for longer term industrialization in developing countries. Apart from detailed overviews, the paper advances a simple alternative formula that can help reconcile policy flexibility with multilateral discipline.  It also provides key points on how the negotiations could accommodate both the immediate needs and longer-term interests of developing countries. industrial_tariffs (Download the full text in PDF format)