Poverty and Inequality in the New World: Moving forward or backward? : A Critique of ‘Globalization, Poverty and Inequality since 1980’ by David Dollar Ranja Sengupta

A critique of David Dollar's recent paper argues that Dollar's argument for globalization on the ground that it has led to increasing growth in the developing world and a reduction of poverty and inequality, cannot be sustained on a closer examination. Detailed and nuanced evidence has begun to challenge the one sided view of globalization in a major way. Poverty_Inequality_ New_World  (Download the full text in PDF format)

Free Trade between Mercosur and India: New bonds, new boundaries Ranja Sengupta

A framework trade agreement was signed between India and the Mercosur trade block of Latin America on the 17th of June in Asuncion, Paraguay. This sets in motion the process that will ultimately establish a 'Free Trade Area' between the Indian market and Mercosur - the Southern Core Common Market in Latin America. "The signing of the framework agreement will pave the way to enter into Preferential Trade Agreement as the first step and ultimately to negotiate a Free Trade Agreement in long-term interest," the official spokesman for the Indian Ministry of Commerce said in New Delhi, prior to the…

Paraguay: Political chaos amidst economic crisis Ranja Sengupta

Political confusion and violent protests have recently rocked the small nation of Paraguay. The situation has been steadily growing out of control, rendering increasingly vulnerable the position of the current president, Gonzalez Machhi. Protestors have been demanding his resignation and reversal of the free market policies that the government has been trying to push through. The intensity of the protests in July brought on a declaration of internal emergency. President Machhi has alienated members of his own Colorado Party as well as those of the opposition parties with whom he had formed an alliance of 'National Unity' in 1999. If…

Bolivia: On the Threshold of a New Future Ranja Sengupta

The presidential election held on 30 June 2002 in Bolivia brought into focus the growing disillusionment of the Bolivian people with the direction in which their country is moving. With the exception of ex-president Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada, who is known to be a proponent of free market reforms, most of the presidential candidates who gained political ground in the pre-election campaign did so on the basis of a promised move away from the existing free market economy and towards greater government investment. They include the populist leader Manfred Reyes Villa of the 'New Republican Force' and former president Jaime…