Argentina Since Default: The IMF and the depression Alan B. Cibils, Mark Weisbrot and Debayani Kar

More than eight months since the economic crisis has passed and Argentina's economy continues to decline, with the recession now having lasted more than four years. This paper looks at Argentina's crisis since the default in an attempt to find a way out of the Depression. argentina_default (Download the full text in PDF format)

Why Argentina Crashed, and is Crashing Eric Hershberg

The catastrophic collapse of the Argentine economy during the second half of 2001, and its accelerating decline during the first half of 2002, has created hardships of a scale and scope that fully justify concluding that the country is undergoing a "Second Great Depression." On the heels of four years of recession Argentina's default on its $140 billion national debt triggered an economic contraction of more than 15% during the first six months of 2002. Unemployment has skyrocketed to encompass a quarter of working age Argentines, and the poverty rate in what was once Latin America's most prosperous republic has…

Why Argentina Crashed, and is Crashing Eric Hershberg [Social Science Research Council]

The catastrophic collapse of the Argentine economy during the second half of 2001, and its accelerating decline during the first half of 2002, has created hardships of a scale and scope that fully justify concluding that the country is undergoing a "Second Great Depression." On the heels of four years of recession Argentina's default on its $140 billion national debt triggered an economic contraction of more than 15% during the first six months of 2002. Unemployment has skyrocketed to encompass a quarter of working age Argentines, and the poverty rate in what was once Latin America's most prosperous republic has…